Noon Hour Webcasts

Monday, October 21, 2013
What are MOOCs doing to the Open Education?

Tuesday, October 22, 2013
Why think about culture in remix?

Wednesday, October 23, 2013
OERu: Blending more affordable education futures

Thursday, October 24, 2013
Cost Savings and User Perceptions of OER

Friday, October 25, 2013
Libraries, OERs, and Open Access




Events

Monday, October 21
Noon to 1 p.m., Mountain Time (Canada)
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What are MOOCs doing to the Open Education?
George Siemens

Higher education is now entering its second year of MOOC hype. The stream of almost daily pronouncements of additional universities joining existing MOOC providers, new funding, new MOOC offerings, and new reports continues unabated. The term "open" in the most contested in the MOOC acronym. What does it mean to be open? Is it sufficient that learners can join a course without cost? Or without pre-requisites? This presentation will explore the impact of MOOCs, mostly negative, through the lens of openness

Bio:

George Siemens is an academic and researcher on learning, technology, networks, analytics, and openness in education. He has delivered keynote addresses in more than 30 countries on the influence of technology and media on education, organizations, and society. His work has been profiled in provincial, national, and international newspapers (including NY Times), radio, and television. His research has received numerous national and international awards, including an honorary doctorate from Universidad de San Martín de Porres for his pioneering work in learning, technology, and networks.

Dr. Siemens is a founding member and President of the Society for Learning Analytics Research (http://www.solaresearch.org/). He has advised government agencies Australia and United States, as well as numerous international universities, on utilizing learning analytics for assessing and evaluating productivity gains in the education sector and improving learner results. In 2008, he pioneered massive open online courses (sometimes referred to as MOOCs) that have included more than 25,000 participants. He blogs at http://www.elearnspace.org/blog/ . He also writes self-aggrandizing bios.


Tuesday, October 22
Noon to 1 p.m., Mountain Time (Canada)
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Why think about culture in remix?
Tel Amiel

Remix is touted as one of the most important practices within the field of open educational resources (OER). But remixing is still not mainstream practice in education and the barriers and limitations to remix are not well known. We will discuss some of the intersecting problems associated with the design and development or resources from the perspective of culture. We'll discuss the creation of a print and web-based booklet created to introduce the topic of OER to schoolteachers. The guide, the first of its kind available in Portuguese, was created through the remix and translation of existing resources available in English. Choosing design-as-remix raised a series of concerns related to licensing, attribution, context, and technical standards. We review the concerns related to culture and inequity within the OER movement, followed by the design choices and procedures, and finally the implications of these issues for the open educational resources movement.

Dr. Tel Amiel is Researcher at the University of Campinas (UNICAMP, Brazil). Since 2003, he co-coordinates funded projects focused on culture, education and new media. He is Chair-Elect in Open Education (UNESCO). He coordinates the Open Education working group (www.educacoaberta.org) a collective that promotes research, development, symposia and workshops on open education and open educational resources. He is an active member of the OER community (www.rea.net.br) and the Open Science initiative (http://www.cienciaaberta.net/) in Brazil.


Wednesday, October 24
Noon to 1 p.m., Mountain Time (Canada)
Recording Unavailable
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OERu: Blending more affordable education futures
Wayne Mackintosh

The OER university (OERu) is an international collaboration of universities, polytechnics and community colleges from five  continents using open education approaches to provide more affordable education for all students worldwide, especially learners who are excluded from the tertiary education sector. Wayne will provide an update on progress of the OERu's prototyping phase and illustrate how OER enables the disaggregation of traditional services in a sustainable way. The OERu network is shifting the question from "How do you achieve sustainable OER projects?" to "How will your institution remain sustainable without OER?"

Bio

Wayne Mackintosh is the founding director of the OER Foundation and is the designated UNESCO - Commonwealth of Learning Chair in OER at Otago Polytechnic. He is coordinating the implementation of the OER university as one of the projects of the UNESCO-COL OER Chair network. 


Thursday, October 24
Noon to 1 p.m., Mountain Time (Canada)
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Cost Savings and User Perceptions of OER
John Hilton III

The high cost of textbooks is of concern not only to college students but also to society as a whole. Open textbooks promise the same educational benefits as traditional textbooks; however, their efficacy remains largely untested. I report on the adoption of a collection of open resources several across secondary schools and community colleges. Research is presented regarding cost savings, student/teacher perceptions, and the efficacy of using open texts.

Bio:

John Hilton III earned his PhD. in Instructional Psychology and Technology from BYU, and an M .Ed from Harvard. His research interests center around open education and open access. I'm a founding member of the Open Education Group (http://openedgroup.org/), and has published several peer-reviewed articles relating to OER.


Friday, October 25
Noon to 1 p.m., Mountain Time (Canada)
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Libraries, OERs, and Open Access
Elaine Fabbro, Colin Elliott, and Rachel Conroy

Athabasca University (AU) and Athabasca University Library have a long history in supporting and promoting Open Access.  AU was the first university in Canada to adopt an Open Access Research Policy and has led many other Open Access initiatives.  As the university moves to a model that utilizes Open Educational Resources, the AU Library is being called upon to support more courses with Open Access resources.  This entails educating faculty, finding open resources, and creating the necessary infrastructure to support OA.  This session will discuss the benefits and challenges of supporting OERs with Open Access.

Bios:

Elaine Fabbro (B.A., Mus.) UBC, MLIS (UWO), MA (AU), is Acting Director, Library Services, and Head, Information Literacy & Public Services. Her work has focused on the provision of information literacy instruction and she has been the Library's representative in the course development process, promoting the use of Library and open access resources in courses.


Colin Elliott (B.Comm., UNBC, M.A, Athabasca University) is the Digitization Coordinator for Athabasca University (AU).  He coordinates the digitization efforts of the AU Library as well as various mobile learning projects.  Colin has coordinated AU’s Digitization Portal, AUSpace (Athabasca University’s Open Access Institutional Repository), the OERKnowledgeCloud, and many other library projects.


Rachel Conroy is a mom to two great kids as well as the Copyright Officer at Athabasca University.  Rachel has worked in Copyright at AU since 2001 and currently manages the Central copyright Office in the Centre for Learning Design and Development at AU. Rachel also maintains the copyright listserv "abccopyright" that is currently composed of over 350 Copyright Professionals
across Canada.


Technical Requirements for Webcasts

What is
Open Access?

Open access is a movement towards open, public access to educational learning resources and scholarly research results.

More about Open Access Week

What are Open Educational Resources?

Digital materials that can be re-used for teaching, learning, research and more, made available for free through open licenses, which allow uses of the materials that would not be easily permitted under copyright alone.

More about Open Educational Resources

Prizes!

A draw for AU ball caps, T-shirts and USB hubs will follow the conclusion of each presentation. Everyone from Athabasca University and beyond is invited to participate.

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